Sydney Seminar > Culture and Society > Articles by: alanalentin

Posts By: alanalentin

ABC Big Ideas to Broadcast the Sydney Seminar

Sometimes we cover our mouths so we don't speak, Abdul Abdullah (2013). Reproduced with the kind permission of the artist.

Sometimes we cover our mouths so we don’t speak, Abdul Abdullah (2013). Reproduced with the kind permission of the artist.

The Sydney Seminar for Culture and Society on creative responses to Islamophobia, a conversation between Alana Lentin, race critical scholar, Yassir Morsi, novelist and researcher, Randa Abdel-Fattah and visual artist, Abdul Abdullah will be broadcast on the ABC Radio National Big Ideas show on April 8 at 20h05. Listen in or download the show later.


Seminar 3: Being Creative / Resisting Islamophobia

Sometimes we cover our mouths so we don't speak, Abdul Abdullah (2013). Reproduced with the kind permission of the artist.

Sometimes we cover our mouths so we don’t speak, Abdul Abdullah (2013). Reproduced with the kind permission of the artist.

Against the backdrop of the moral panic about Islam in Australia, a special Sydney Seminar for Culture and Society will discuss how young Muslims in Australia are resisting cultural stereotypes in novel ways.

Hosted by the Institute for Culture and Society at the University of Western Sydney and held at the Sydney Mechanic’s School of Arts, Being Creative/ Resisting Islamophobia features artists in conversation with race and racism academics to discuss creativity in an era of suspicion and prejudice.

By countering negative stereotypes about Islam with subtlety and complexity, Muslim artists in Australia are sparking new ways of thinking about religion and culture.

Presented by Associate Professor Alana Lentin, from the UWS Institute for Culture and Society, and Dr Yassir Morsi, from the University of South Australia, a Muslim novelist and a visual artist will discuss how they help spark new conversations with wider society.

  • Randa Abdel- Fattah is a doctoral student researching Islamophobia in the Department of Sociology at Macquarie University and an award-winning author of ten novels.
  • Abdul Abdullah is a visual artist. His work is included in the collections of the National Gallery of Australia, the University of Western Australia, and The Islamic Museum of Australia. Most recently his painting ‘The Man’ of boxer Anthony Mundine was selected as a finalist in the 2013 Archibald Prize.

 In our times, Muslims, like other stigmatised minorities, are thought of as one-dimensional,” says Associate Professor Alana Lentin, the author of The Crises of Multiculturalism and Racism and Anti-Racism in Europe

This event sheds light on how artists working with different media respond to being Muslim in Australia and globally.

Can we call Islamophobia racism? If so how do we respond? And what does art have to tell us about how to do so in creative and surprising ways?

The third Sydney Seminar for Society and Culture, Being Creative/ Resisting Islamaphobia, will be held at the Mitchell Theatre at the Sydney Mechanics’ School of Arts at 6pm on December 2, 2014.

Please RSVP by emailing c.nguy@uws.edu.au


Race and the Politics of Performance

 

Sydney-Seminar_1_Flyer-1The inaugural Sydney Seminar for Culture and Society took place on December 2, 2013 at the State Library of New South Wales. The seminar was a conversation between Sohail Daulatzai (Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies at the University of California Irvine and author of Black Star, Crescent Moon: The Muslim International and Black Freedom Beyond America) and award winning Melbourne based comedian Aamer Rahman, formerly of the comedy duo, Fear of a Brown Planet.

Sydney Seminar 1

ICS Professor Gregory Noble addresses the seminar

The seminar was chaired by Suvendrini Perera, Professor of Cultural Analysis in the Department of Cultural Studies at Curtin University of Technology.

Black star

Black Star, Crescent Moon by Sohail Daulatzai

The seminar was attended by around 100 people and involved a wide ranging discussion of race and racism in the post-9/11 context in light, particularly, of the growth of what Sohail Daulatzai, in his book, Black Star, Crescent Moon, describes as a ‘Muslim International’. Discussion of how this new internationalism, inspired by the black, pan-Africanist and decolonial politics of the 1950s and 60s, bears on the worlds of hip-hop and comedy engaged the audience who, in questions to the panel, drew on experience of everyday racism, Aboriginality and Islamophobia in Australia.